When Code Doesn’t Meet Standards


Ever since the World Wide Web Consortium, popularly known as W3C came into being, there has been a tide of agreements and disagreements. It lays down standards for validation of webpages for the coding in the HTML and CSS formats. This process of validation is focused on enabling the compatibility of your website with various browsers.

W3C undoubtedly increases the usability and compatibility of each project. The provision of rendering error-free coding in this validation has made it quite popular among the fraternity of web developers. Similarly, for the SEO industry, W3C was a godsend tool. The rat-race of SEOs to prove their mettle certainly called for a need of such a compliant technique.

The inability of the websites to remain compliant with various browsers lead to a significant reduction in the potential visits on websites. Hence, making the websites accessible to non-compliant users increases the reliability of your project. Ensuring W3C compliance assists in rendering performance at par with the industry standards.

Thus, validating your source code would certainly reflect the personality of your company and help to generate more business. These user-friendly coding standards also debug the errors enabling the webpage to appear almost the same regardless of the browser. The convenience of the validation procedure also facilitates a reliable quality-check.

Hence, all the web professionals endorse the validation standards as a mark of proficiency and competency. In a nutshell, W3C is all about:

  • Maintaining a compatibility with various web browsers
  • Identifying and fixing the random errors in coding
  • Enhancing the presentation of the website
  • Diminishing the outdated code
  • Increasing the competence of the webpage with the help of clean code

Consequently, W3C validation is now synonymous to professionalism. But, the interjections made by people on the effect of W3C conformity for improving the rankings of their websites have been a point of contention since then.

Therefore, it can be concluded that W3C has been under scanner since its launch, but it has strived hard to emerge as a successful tool for the web developers. So, next time you go searching for web designers for any project, verify the W3C validation.

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “When Code Doesn’t Meet Standards”

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s